The term canadian english has a pedigree dating to 1857

Dating to the 1st century BC, Dùn Carloway is the best preserved broch in the Western Isles.

The most popular visitor attraction in the Western Isles, Callanish standing stones comprise an avenue and rows of stones erected around a circle to form a cruciform.Construction started 5,000 years ago with the 13 metre diameter circle, the rows of stones were added in later years, finally a burial tomb was built in the circle. Other single mentions of: Clark, Cockburn, Cook, Crabbe, Fair, Galt, Rattray, Wallace. LNK 1685-1863 T C Some mention of the LAMMINGTON family. AUBINI see QUINCEY AUCHTERLONE SCOT 1715-1980 T C Containing material on: COCKBURN, DOWIE, GLEN, HOWDEN, STEWART. AUS 1800-1960 T Pedigree Chart mentioning: ASHE, FORSYTH, IRVINE, Mc INNES. ALLAN BAN 1710-1976 T C Five very large family trees with many descendants of this Allan family, including: DUSSEL, GUNN, RENNIE, GUNN-RUSSELL (name change in 1915). Tree of the family descending from Thomas Allan in Edinburgh, circa 1680 ALLAN ABD 1766-1900 T Other families mentioned: LITTLEJOHN, MCBAIN, RUXTON, SHEARER, THOMSON.

ALLAN SCOT 1692-1900 T C Mainly material from OPR and census for LKS, MLN, ELN, PER. ALLAN BWK 1813-1950 LT 1 The tree includes photocopies of relevant histories, maps and photographs.

ABERCROMBY see STRANG ABERDEEN FIF c1710 - c.1912 T A booklet on the family in Coupar Angus and Edinburgh. ADAM PER 1851 - 1891 Extracts from the censuses, 1851 - 1891. Contains information on the INSCH and ASHER families. ALLAN ABD 1771-1977 Census and OPR material on Allan and GRAY.

ABRAHAM see MILLS ADAIR WIG / D&G c.1500 - 1711 T The families of Kinhilt and Drumore, most probably taken from P. ALLAN BAN 1750-1916 Pedigree charts with: CAMERON, CRUIKSHANK, HARE, JACK, MCINTOSH, MCLEAN, ROBB, SLORACH, STUART, THOMSON, WATSON. MLN 1680-1854 T C Descendants of Ebenezer Allan, mainly in Australia.

The site fell out of use 3,000 years ago and the area site was farmed until peat enveloped the site.

Then in the 1857 the peat was cleared to allow the stones full height to be appreciated.

I think this was the busiest beach I came across on my trip. At Gearannan, a derelict crofters' village in a scenic position on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, has been restored.